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Wakhi Express magazine’s second edition launched PM00000030000000231 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in Gojal Pakistan, Poetry, wakhi.
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Pamir Times:

The Shadow Girls’ Academy (SGA) has launched the second edition of “Wakhi Express”, a bi-lingual magazine edited by Karim Khan Saka.

The second edition of SGA’s Wakhi Express has been dedicated to the “unique culture of Wakhi (Tajik) people living in China”.

A profile of Mastar Sultan Ali (aka Ustad Samarqand) is part of the second edition, throwing light on the educational, social and religious services of a legendary teacher and activist. Profiles of mountaineer Rajab Shah and Master Daulat Amin, two important personalities of Gojal valley, are also included in the magazine. More profiles of similar icons will be included in the magazine’s future editions.

Most interestingly, more than half of the magazine’s content is in Wakhi language, written in Roman script.

A travelogue written by the chief editor, with eye-catching photographs and interesting details of some time spent in China, is probably the most absorbing piece in the magazine.

Wakhi songs penned by Karim Khan (editor), Nazir Ahmed Bulblul and Saifuddin Saif are also included in the magazine.

Overall, the magazine is a good initiative for promotion and preservation of Wakhi language and culture.

The readers will, however, face considerable difficulty in reading the Wakhi script, largely due to non-familiarity with many of the symbols used.

Team of the Wakhi Express, while deserving appreciating for taking the step, may consider to make the magazine completely bilingual by providing Wakhi and English translations of all the content.—

For details about availability of the magazine you may like to reach wakhi.express@gmail.com

The Wakhi Community Settlements in Northern Pakistan PM00000020000005031 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in wakhi, Wakhi History.
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Dr. Nadeem Shafiq

Abstract
Pakistan is an area with unique ethnic diversity, specifically on the
basis of language. This present study focuses on the Wakhi identity.
Wakhi still exists as a non-written language. The present Wakhi settlers
have come to Chitral at various times. Under British rule the Wakhi
immigrants settled in different parts of Chitral and now their majority lies
in Gojal tehsil of Hunza of Gilgit – Baltistan. This community enjoys
unique cultural heritage and enjoy distinct features, which are seen all
over the world with keen interest.
The Northern Pakistan is an area of geographical and ethnic diversity and is
placed among the most multilingual places of the world.
The important languages spoken in the region include Shina, Balti, Burushashki, Khawar and
Wakhi.
Image
Photo Ali Rehmat Musofer

Wakhi is basically the language of inhabitants of Wakhan Corridor, an
area presently divided between the extreme northeast of Afghanistan and
Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Province of Tajikistan. It belongs to the
southern group of the Pamiri languages which are spoken in the mountainous
regions of Afghanistan and Tajikistan
Complete at source: http://pu.edu.pk/images/journal/pols/Currentissue-pdf/THE%20WAKHI%20COMMUNITY%20PAKISTAN.pdf

The First Wakhi Dictionary with pronunciation AM000000110000005331 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in Alphabet, wakhi.
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Wakhi Dictionary with pronunciation

the first ever great and unique Wakhi online dictionary with prounciation, a gift for Wakhi community and Wakhi learners from all over the World. this great work are don by two Professors from Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan.

Click on Index for Wakhi Vocabularies, Wakhi – English

INDEX  >  Speaker (sound).>Ɣ̌ef- fireplace

URL: http://www.coelang.tufs.ac.jp/multilingual_corpus/wakhi/

Passu Image & Thematic Map (in Wakhi Script) AM000000100000005130 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in gojal, Gojal Pakistan, Villages.
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passu_map2

Click to enlarge

By Ali Rehmat Musofer

On GIS Day (19 November 2008), The first Image and thematic Map of Passu in Wakhi Script is published in Wakhi Blog for the interest of viewers, linguists, travelers, and tourists, These map are published for the test only, we are working on a very detail map of Gojal with all local names in Wakhi script, Inshallah with the collaboration of WTCA, MASGIS, Gojal Local Council and other NGOs, we will publish the first Wakhi Map of Gojal in coming year in 2009. We need your contribution and good suggestions. We will conduct a research based survey in Gojal to find out all the local names of different valleys and villages and mapped them on their exact location (geographic location) with all details and phtographs of the physical, cultural sites, hotels, shops etc. So many location original names are changed and so many are reading and writing wrongly, i.e. Khunzhrav to Khunzhrab.
 click to open the pdf for clear view.

 passu_imag_map

passu

Thematic detail map of Passu village………..Open the pdf for clear view

open pdf for clear view

passu_map1

 

Passu has been one of the most visited regions of Gojal valley. Passu is famous because it is home of the Batura Glacier. Adding more to the beauty of Passu, standing at the Northern end of the village, is Mount Tupopdon. Inspired by its unique structural attributes tourists have promoted the peak by giving it new names. Some call it “Passu Cones” and others “Passu Cathedral”. Mount Tupopdon is the most photographed peak of the region.  
Passu Diyor e Jayišt :
Yašvendan, Nobod, Past Diyor, Jonabod, Ṣ̌it, Kip Ɣ̌ar, Yaz e ben, Pitk e mis, Sыrыnobod, Tepopdan,

Xuramabod:

Avdegar, Reč, Zwor, Čramn, daṣ̌t,

 

Woz ki cumer be jayve nungišt tey, nivšit. Ṣ̌oboṣ̌it

gisday1

GIS DAY 2008 (www.gisday.com)

Language Map PM00000010000002531 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in wakhi.
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Source: http://www.southasiabibliography.de/index.html

Boroghil Chitral, Pakistan AM00000080000002531 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in Boroghil Pakistan, People, wakhi.
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Living Room like a Buddhist Monastery

We are here in the living room in the central part of a complex traditional house in Northern Chitral, Pakistan. This room has the kitchen (in front) and the sleeping places on the sides and on the back. The roof is built with wood, the same way as the roof of Buddhist Monasteries in the Himalayas are built. The people here are Ismaelites. During the long winter months between November and April they spend most of their time in this room. It is a rare honour for foreign guests to be invited to enter such a house. Most of the families in this valley have a guest room outside the main building.

Living Room in a Wakhi House in Boroghil

About hundred families of the Wakhi tribe live in the Boroghil valley, the northern most part of Pakistan, along the Wakhan corridor of Afghanistan. This photo shows a Wakhi family in the central living room of their house, where they will spend most of the time during the coming six winter months. The only surce of light is an opening on the roof which has a similar construction as old Buddhist monastries in Tibet.This photo is shot with the sparce available light.

More pcture from Boroghil: http://photo.net/photodb/member-photos?user_id=1784134

Wakhi Ensyclopaedia, Britannica AM00000060000005931 7, 2008

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  • modern Iranian dialect ( in Iranian languages: Dialects )Speakers of Wakhī number 10,000 or so in the region of the upper Pyandzh (Panj) River. Vākhān (Wākhān), the Persian name for the region in which Wakhī is spoken, is based on the local name Wux̌, a Wakhī development of *Waxšu, the old name of the Oxus River (modern Amu Darya). (An asterisk denotes a hypothetical, unattested, reconstructed…
  • More detail at source: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/634297/Wakhi-language

    Wakhi language:

    Classification and Distribution

    Wakhi is one of several languages that belong to the Pamir language group. A reflection of this is the fact that the Wakhi people are occasional called Pamiris. The origin of this language is Wakhan, an area divided between in the extreme northeast of Afghanistan and Gorno-Badakhshan Autonomous Province in Tajikistan. A very rough estimate of the population of Wakhi Tajiks is 50,000 worldwide. The Wakhi live in four different countries. In the northern areas of Pakistan the Wakhi people mainly live in Gojal, Ishkoman, Darkut, and Broghol. They also live in many parts of Tajikistan, Afghanistan, and China. The religion of the Wakhi is Shia Ismaili Islam; they are followers of Aga Khan IV.

    In Tajikistan

    There is some controversy surrounding the ethnic and linguistic designation of the Wakhi. In Tajikistan the Wakhi and other communities that speak one of the Pamir languages refer to themselves as Pamiri or Badakhshani and there has been a movement to separate their identity from that of the majority Tajiks. Conversely, in Pakistan the Wakhi refer to themselves as Tajiks. Whether Wakhi is a separate language from Tajik or a dialect of Tajik has been equally controversial. Linguists universally refer to Wakhi as an Iranian language independent of Tajik, but many Tajik nationalists insist that Wakhi and other Pamir languages are actually dialects of Tajik.[1]

    In Pakistan

    In Pakistan, the central organization of the Wakhi is the Wakhi Tajik Cultural Association Pakistan (WTCA), an organization that is registered with the Government of Pakistan and which works with the collaboration of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism and Lok Virsa Pakistan. The Association is working for the preservation of the Wakhi Tajiki language and culture, as well as documenting their poetry and music. The literacy rate among Wakhi Tajiks in the northern areas of Pakistan is about 60%.

    Radio Pakistan Gilgit relays the Wakhi radio programme “Sadoyah Boomy Dunyo”, the voice of the roof of the world. The Wakhi Tajik Cultural Association has arranged more than twenty programmes since 1984, which includes cultural shows, musical nights, and large-scale musical festivals with the collaboration of Lok Virsa Pakistan, the Aga Khan Cultural Service Pakistan (AKCSP), and Pakistan television. In 2000, the WTCA won a “Best Programme” organizer award in the Silk Road Festival from the President of Pakistan, Pervez Musharraf. A computerized codification of the Wakhi script has been released, which will help to promote the language development programme and documentation of Wakhi poetry, literature, and history. [2] 

    .

     

     

    In China

    Tajiks in China (Chinese: 塔吉克族, Pinyin: Tǎjíkèzú) are one of the 56 nationalities officially recognized by the People’s Republic of China.
    This group, with a population of 41,028 (2000), is located mainly in China‘s western Xinjiang region with 60% living in Tashkurgan Tajik Autonomous County; some researchers view them as a collection of over a dozen small East Iranian ethnic groups that are related to, but distinct from, the Tajiks of Tajikistan.[citation needed] The Ethnologue claims that they are actually Shugni and Wakhi.[2] Aurel Stein and other writers from his time referred to them simply as Sarikoli.[3][4] Some have referred to them simply as “Mountain Tajiks.”[5] Robert Shaw considered them Sarikolis and Wakhis, referring to them collectively as Ghalchah.
    In China, the languages of the Tajiks have no official written form. The great majority of Chinese Tajik speakers speak the Sarikoli language and use Uyghur, Kyrgyz or Chinese to communicate with people of other nationalities in the area. A small proportion of Chinese Tajik speakers speak Wakhi.
    More detail at source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wakhi_language

    THE PAMIRI HOUSE PM00000020000002331 7, 2008

    Posted by Mыsofer in wakhan.
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    One of the most important repositories of the culture of the Pamirs is the traditional Pamiri house, locally known as ‘Chid’. It embodies elements of ancient Aryan philosophy – including Zoroastrianism – many of which have since been assimilated into Pamiri Ismaili tradition. What to the untrained eye looks like a very basic – even primitive – structure, is, for the people who live in it, rich in religious and philosophical meaning. The symbolism of specific structural features of the Pamiri house goes back over two and a half thousand years.

    The house itself is the symbol of the universe and also the place of private prayer and worship for Pamiri Ismailis – the Ismailis have as yet no mosques in Gorno-Badakhshan. The layout of the house is as described below, although some houses have a mirror-image of what is described.

    The Pamiri house is normally built of stones and plaster, with a flat roof on which hay, apricots, mulberries or dung for fuel can be dried.

    More detail at source:

    http://www.pamirs.org/pamiri%20house.htm

    Passu Diyor AM00000040000005031 7, 2008

    Posted by Mыsofer in Villages.
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    Photo by Musofer

    Passu and Shimshal valleys have been two of the most visited regions of Gojal valley. Passu is famous because it is home of the Batura Glacier. Adding more to the beauty of Passu, standing at the Northern end of the village, is Mount Tupopdon. Inspired by its unique structural attributes tourists have promoted the peak by giving it new names. Some call it “Passu Cones” and others “Passu Cathedral”. Mount Tupopdon is the most photographed peak of the region.

    Passu Diyor e Jayišt :

    Yašvendan, Nobod, Past Diyor, Jonabod, Ṣ̌it, Kip Ɣ̌ar, Yaz e ben, Pitk e mis, Sыrыnobod, Tepopdan,

     

     

    Xuramabod:

    Avdegar, Reč, Zwor, Čramn, daṣ̌t,

     

     

     

    Woz ki cumer be jayve nungišt tey, nivšit. Ṣ̌oboṣ̌it