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Passu Image & Thematic Map (in Wakhi Script) AM000000100000005130 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in gojal, Gojal Pakistan, Villages.
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passu_map2

Click to enlarge

By Ali Rehmat Musofer

On GIS Day (19 November 2008), The first Image and thematic Map of Passu in Wakhi Script is published in Wakhi Blog for the interest of viewers, linguists, travelers, and tourists, These map are published for the test only, we are working on a very detail map of Gojal with all local names in Wakhi script, Inshallah with the collaboration of WTCA, MASGIS, Gojal Local Council and other NGOs, we will publish the first Wakhi Map of Gojal in coming year in 2009. We need your contribution and good suggestions. We will conduct a research based survey in Gojal to find out all the local names of different valleys and villages and mapped them on their exact location (geographic location) with all details and phtographs of the physical, cultural sites, hotels, shops etc. So many location original names are changed and so many are reading and writing wrongly, i.e. Khunzhrav to Khunzhrab.
 click to open the pdf for clear view.

 passu_imag_map

passu

Thematic detail map of Passu village………..Open the pdf for clear view

open pdf for clear view

passu_map1

 

Passu has been one of the most visited regions of Gojal valley. Passu is famous because it is home of the Batura Glacier. Adding more to the beauty of Passu, standing at the Northern end of the village, is Mount Tupopdon. Inspired by its unique structural attributes tourists have promoted the peak by giving it new names. Some call it “Passu Cones” and others “Passu Cathedral”. Mount Tupopdon is the most photographed peak of the region.  
Passu Diyor e Jayišt :
Yašvendan, Nobod, Past Diyor, Jonabod, Ṣ̌it, Kip Ɣ̌ar, Yaz e ben, Pitk e mis, Sыrыnobod, Tepopdan,

Xuramabod:

Avdegar, Reč, Zwor, Čramn, daṣ̌t,

 

Woz ki cumer be jayve nungišt tey, nivšit. Ṣ̌oboṣ̌it

gisday1

GIS DAY 2008 (www.gisday.com)

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Passing Time In Passu.. AM00000090000004231 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in gojal, Gojal Pakistan, Places, Villages.
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01 Cathedral Mountains.., Passu, Pakistan

Cathedral Mountains..

After Karimabad we made our way up to Passu which is about 70 kilometres from the Chinese border. Essentially Passu is a small town situated right on the KKH. Surrounded by mountainous peaks (including a stunning backdrop called the Cathedral Mountains) and two glaciers it’s a great place to base yourself for a couple of treks in the area. Compared to Karimabad it’s a very very small village with only three shops none of which stayed open past 8PM. It’s certainly not a place to come if you want to party which suited us fine.

More Pics: http://spatialworld.multiply.com/photos/album/19/PASSU

The village itself is a nice place to walk around for half a day or so and all the village kids love to race around you or simply practice their English. In this part of Pakistan (and Hunza in general) the women folk are also very visible and keen to talk (mainly to Kat). A nice change from other parts of Pakistan.

In reality there’s not much to do in Passu itself but watch the trucks come and go to the Chinese border, watching the villagers come and go about their business and complete a couple of day treks around the area (more on them in the next two pods).

And that’s Passu I guess.

Next Pod – Two Bridges Trek, Passu, Pakistan. Love, Nath and Kat.

Source: http://www.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/natandkat/nkhoneymoon/1160126460/tpod.html

Chapursan Valley AM00000090000002131 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in gojal, Gojal Pakistan, Places, Villages.
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Yishkuk Lake, Zood Khun, Pakistan

Yishkuk Lake

We were unable to do the Rakaposhi trek due to cloudy weather to decided to spend the last 2 days in the Chapursun Valley, where few tourists go, but borders Afghanistan. We enjoyed beautiful scenery on the way and best jeep tracked we’d been on, including scary bits for Maggi. We stayed at Pamir Serai which is a Wakhi style home – 1 room around a hole in the ceiling, run by an enterprising local Alam Jan, sadly away in Kabul. Luckily a German Stefan, who had been staying for 2 weeks, who acted as our guide telling us things to do in the area. Chapursan Valley, Zood Khun, Pakistan

We went for a fabulous walk up to the lakes at Yishkuk, which were incredibly clear with beautiful colours, before being invited into a shepherds hut for chai and lassi.

The next day we went for a walk on the Yishkuk glacier, where there are some fantastic blue icebergs at the head – we broke of chunks of ice to drink from that were hard and crystal clear like huge diamonds.

More detail at source: http://www.travelpod.com

Borith Lake AM00000090000000531 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in gojal, Gojal Pakistan, Places, Villages.
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Borit Lake (enjoy large version)

From Ghulkin a footpath crosses the grey Hussaini Glacier to Botith Lake (2645m), two hours away. It’s about 1¼ km across the glacier, although the way ismarked by rocks pile on the south moraine, it’s easy to your bearings.Borith Lake is although about five hours (about 12 km) from Gulmit via kamaris, or two to three hours (about 8 km) via the KKH to Ghulkin or half an hour from   Hussaini. you can spend the night at Borith Lake Hotel is at the east-south corner of the lake. Passu is about two hours from the lake (closer to three if you walk on the KKH).

Approximately 2 km to the north of Ghulkin lies Borith Lake, a saline body of water occupying a small hollow at an elevation of 2500 meters. The lake can be reached via a 2 km unpaved jeep route from Hussaini village, which lies adjacent to Ghulkin village. It is also accessible by a 2-3 hour trekking route directly from Ghuylkin, across the end of the glacier. The site is an important sanctuary for migrating wildfowl and is a must to be included in the itinerary of bird-watchers and nature lovers. To witness the large number of ducks arriving from the warmer parts of southern Pakistan, one should visit between the months of March and June. The birds rest here on their way northwards to the cooler waters of central Asia. Similarly, from September – November, the spectacle occurs in reverse with the onset of winter towards the north.

Source: http://photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=5170187

Ghulkin Village: AM00000090000001731 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in gojal, Gojal Pakistan, Villages.
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Ghulkin Village is located in Gojal, upper Hunza. It is reached by following the Karakoram Highway (KKH) 140km north of Gilgit. This trip takes 3-4 hours by van. From a turn-off just beyond Gulmit, a winding jeep track leads upwards for 3 km, until the ground flattens out and the first houses of the village come into view.

Ghulkin occupies the site of an old glacier fed lake, which has been silted up by continuous sedimentation. Many of the 140 traditional dwellings that constitute Ghulkin village are arranged in a circular form, facing the one-time shores of the lake, creating a wonderfully communal atmosphere. The central area now supports several dwellings and fields, including a strip of land often used as a cricket pitch.

There is no accurate historical record of the origin of the village, though it is estimated to be around 600 years old. According to local folklore, there were settlements here while the lake was still in existence, this area being used as pastureland in summer. The name is derived from two words of the local Wakhi dialect, ‘Ghulk’, meaning ‘well’ and ‘kin’, meaning ‘whose’.

Being an area of low rainfall, the most vital requirement is water for irrigation, livestock, drinking and domestic use. Khawaja Ahmed, and Ismaili Muslim who came here with the Mir of Hunza, asked him for land. After the Mir agreed, Khawaja Ahmed mobilised the people of the area to construct a water-channel to irrigate the land. This made cultivation possible and the Ismaili settlement flourished. Now small scale health and educational institutions, electricity and water-sully facilities are available in the village. Through the involvement of capacity-building NGOs, there is also a handicraft production centre and opportunities for other vocational training.

The Jammatkhana, the central religious institution for all Ismaili Muslims, holds a strong position in the community. Apart from its religious functions, it provides a central location for community meetings, festivals, celebrations, resolution of disputes and much more.

In Upper Hunza, winters are long and can become bitterly cold, though the seasoned winter traveller will see a world of immense beauty at this time of the year. Snowfall brings with it the Himalayian ibex, descending in search for grass breaking through the covering snow. Summers are hot in the north, though more pleasant than the harsh temperatures in summer are around 30 degrees Celsius. In winter the temperature remains below freezing point, further dropping at night.

 

More detail at source: http://www.pearltours.com.pk/vallyes/ghulkin.htm

Kыmpir Diyor AM000000110000001530 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in gojal, Gojal Pakistan, Places, Villages.
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                                            Photo: Musofer
Lesson of Kumpir Diyor
http://www.chipursantours.org/about.htm
.
Villages of Gojal (Ṣ̌iṣ̌kat to Zuwudxon) Photo by Musofer
http://spatialworld.multiply.com/photos/album/11/Villages_of_Gojal

Shimshal Pakistan – Introducing the area – 1 AM000000100000001031 7, 2008

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mountain landscape in Shimshal, PakistanNorthern Pakistan borders Afghanistan, China and India and is home to three significant mountain ranges: the Hindu Kush, the Western Himalaya, and the Karakoram. The Karakoram mountain range contains the greatest concentration of high peaks in the world and the longest glaciers outside the Polar region. Five of the world’s 14 peaks over 8000m are in Northern Pakistan, including the world’s second highest mountain K2, and there are some 82 peaks over 7000m within a radius of 180 kilometres. The region is also characterised by much diversity in terms of language and culture. There are more than 10 different languages, several different Islamic sects (including Ismaili, Sunni and Shia), and several communities belonging to non-Islamic belief systems.

The testimonies in the Pakistan collection are from Shimshal, a community whose territory makes up a significant part of the Karakoram mountain range in Northern Pakistan. It includes many peaks over 6000 metres, numerous glaciers and productive alpine pastures. “We have something…that others don’t: beautiful nature – the mountains and glaciers, and independence,” says Inayat, conveying the pride and attachment Shimshalis have for their environment.

mountain lake in Shimshal, PakistanShimshal village lies at 3100m and most of the cultivatable area lies between 3000 and 3300 metres. The short growing season at this altitude allows only one crop to be cultivated in a year; the major crops are wheat, barley, potatoes and peas. Shimshal is one of the few communities in Pakistan’s Northern Areas that grows enough agricultural produce to feed itself. It is the sole steward of vast areas of high-altitude pasture, and extensive herding of sheep, goats, cattle and yaks allows Shimshalis to earn much of their income from the sale of livestock and livestock products.

Shimshalis trace their ancestors back 14 generations to their “grandfather” Mamusing who settled in the area with his wife. Their son, Sher, claimed rights over the Pamir – the pastures – after winning a polo match against herders from Kyrgyzstan. Several narrators describe this story in detail. Others recall the era when Shimshal was part of the independent principality of Hunza, ruled and taxed by the Mir. In 1974, President Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto declared an end to the remaining princely states in Pakistan, including Hunza.

two men talking in Shimshal, PakistanShimshalis are Wakhi speakers and Ismaili Muslims. Members of the same cultural-linguistic group live in other valleys in Northern Pakistan, as well as the Wakhan corridor of Afghanistan, and parts of China and Tajikistan. Ismailism is a branch of Shia Islam and Ismailis follow their living Imam (spiritual leader), currently the Aga Khan.

http://www.mountainvoices.org/pakistan.asp

Friendly People AM00000090000005031 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in Villages.
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23, Gilgit, Pakistan

 

Walking around the village I met wonderful, friendly people, most speaking a very good english. In the north here, the locals are mostly Wakhi and Ismaeli Muslims, the same people I ‘ve got to meet in Tajik Pamir and the Wakhan corridor a few months before. As I mentioned then the Islamelis are all very progressive Muslims, well-educated, with women fully integrated in the social and economic life. However, even though they are the same people, it is striking to see how more open, curious, reliable and just simply happy people seem to be here in comparison with Tajikistan. And it something I could generalise to the all country, not only with Ismaelis. I have tried to understand why that is and the only conclusion I could come up with was that in Tajikistan (and Central Asia) people have until recently lived under the debilitating forces of communism and dependence from Moscow. They now live under repressive regimes with corruption endemic at all levels of society. In contrast, while the Pakistani regime is maybe not the most transparent in the world, the people of the Northern Areas have been more or less left to their own device so far and proudly built their economy by themselves (and lots of help from the Swiss based Aga Khan Foundation). Personally after just a few hours there I knew I was dealing with a very different kind of environment and people and it was a real relief to feel that I could trust most (if not all) the persons I would deal with.Source: http://www.travelpod.com/travel-blog-entries/jtroussier/1/1214159400.html

Passu Diyor AM00000040000005031 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in Villages.
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Photo by Musofer

Passu and Shimshal valleys have been two of the most visited regions of Gojal valley. Passu is famous because it is home of the Batura Glacier. Adding more to the beauty of Passu, standing at the Northern end of the village, is Mount Tupopdon. Inspired by its unique structural attributes tourists have promoted the peak by giving it new names. Some call it “Passu Cones” and others “Passu Cathedral”. Mount Tupopdon is the most photographed peak of the region.

Passu Diyor e Jayišt :

Yašvendan, Nobod, Past Diyor, Jonabod, Ṣ̌it, Kip Ɣ̌ar, Yaz e ben, Pitk e mis, Sыrыnobod, Tepopdan,

 

 

Xuramabod:

Avdegar, Reč, Zwor, Čramn, daṣ̌t,

 

 

 

Woz ki cumer be jayve nungišt tey, nivšit. Ṣ̌oboṣ̌it