jump to navigation

Time Magazine: The Wakhan Corridor AM000000100000002231 7, 2008

Posted by Mыsofer in wakhan, wakhi.
Tags:
trackback

Best Place to Escape the Office – Afghanistan – Time.com

Local guides, trained by the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF), offer expert introductions to the region’s nomadic cultures.

The AKF has also established a string of simple guesthouses and spacious yurts for trekkers along the length of the journey, meaning that you can enjoy many of the comforts of home, without the proximity of work.

wakhan_0505

There was a time when coming to a country like war-torn Afghanistan would constitute “getting away from it all.” But these days, your BlackBerry will work in Kabul, so a real escape requires extreme measures. That would be a trip to the Wakhan Corridor in Afghanistan’s remote northeast — a refuge so remote that not even the Taliban bothered to visit it in their countrywide rampage. In fact, this narrow finger of land that reaches past Pakistan and Tajikistan to poke China is the safest place in Afghanistan, populated only by Kyrgyz and Wakhi nomads.

Getting to the valley trailhead involves a propeller-plane flight from Kabul and 21/2 days’ drive along a rutted track. There’s another day of pony-trekking over a mountain pass before you reach the start of a broad valley whose end lies far beyond the horizon. Few places are harder to get to, but no place is more worth it. Marco Polo spent nearly a year here, recovering from the strains of his epic travels, and the serrated, snowcapped peaks fringing the valley are home to the great sheep that bear his name — their spiral horns littering the passes and adorning nomad tents. (The grass was so rich, wrote Polo, that it took only 10 days to fatten an entire flock of sheep for the winter.) In 1891, at the peak of the Great Game, British explorer and spy Francis Younghusband dallied here as well, picnicking on caviar and champagne with a Russian general among the ancient beehive-shaped ruins of Bozai Gombaz, an old Kyrgyz settlement about three days’ walk from the start.

Along the length of the valley, which takes four days to traverse, runs the source of the Amu Darya River, once known as the Oxus. This makes the Wakhan broad and flat and a pleasure to walk, but ponies offer a change of pace. Local guides, trained by the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF), offer expert introductions to the region’s nomadic cultures. Food is simple — rice, lamb, yogurt — but you can easily augment it with a yak-load of your own goodies to last the two-week round trip. The AKF has also established a string of simple guesthouses and spacious yurts for trekkers along the length of the journey, meaning that you can enjoy many of the comforts of home, without the proximity of work. The office can still call you on a satellite phone, of course. But only until the batteries run out.

Time.com

Advertisements

Comments»

1. Mareile - AM000000110000005331 7, 2008

picture is ©Matthieu Paley/www.paleyphoto.com – thanks


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: